University Launches New Website, Accessible SU

accessibleSyracuse University has launched a new website, Accessible SU (www.syr.edu/accessiblesu/), as part of its commitment to inclusion, accessibility and non-discrimination toward people of all abilities. The site serves as a jumping-off point for anyone seeking information on accessibility, disability services, accommodations and academic and other programs related to disability at Syracuse University.

Accessible SU is designed to serve a broad audience, from SU faculty, staff and students to visitors, potential students or employees, applicants and others interested in learning about what SU has to offer in the areas of disability studies, programs, culture and resources.

“Syracuse University has deep academic and activist roots in the realm of disability studies; equal rights for people with disabilities; and inclusion in higher education, the workforce and all areas of society,” says Kal Alston, senior vice president for human capital development. “That tradition is continued today through scholarship, advocacy and teaching, and institutional policies of equity, inclusion and fairness. Accessible SU is a reflection of this, as well as a practical tool that pulls together a lot of resources in one place, and gives people an easy way to access them.”

Whether you are a wheelchair user planning to attend a game at the Dome, a community member looking for a place to connect with people with and without disabilities, or a faculty or staff member seeking an accommodation for yourself or someone you teach or supervise, you can find a connection to information you need online through Accessible SU. There’s also a link that takes you directly to an accessible form that allows you to report a concern or to make a suggestion about disability access, including the accessibility of Accessible SU.

The site features new additions to the campus community, such as the Disability Cultural Center, as well as SU institutions such as the Center on Human Policy, Law, and Disability Studies, the Burton Blatt Institute and the Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education. Student organizations also are featured, including the Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee, the Disability Law Society and the Disability Student Union.

“It is meaningful and exciting to me to be able to bear witness to and participate in SU’s continuous dedication to students, faculty, staff and community members, with and without disabilities, in the unfurling of this innovative and important new portal,” says Diane Wiener, director of the Disability Cultural Center and research associate professor in the School of Education.